1914 - 1915 Star

This bronze medal is very similar to the 1914 Star but has the dates 1914-15 in the centre of the star. It was issued to a much wider range of recipients. These included all who served in any theatre of war outside the UK between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915, except those eligible for the 1914 Star. The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit were impressed on the reverse. An estimated 2.4 million 1914-15 Stars were issued. Neither the 1914 Star nor the 1914-15 Star were awarded alone. The recipient would also have received the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. What is a Service Medal? A Service Medal is awarded to all those who meet a particular set of criteria. These criteria are usually that an individual has served in a specific area, usually for a specified minimum time between set dates. There were a total of six service medals available for men and women who saw military service in the First World War.

Sometimes these are misleadingly known as ‘campaign’ medals. Which actually refer to medals that were awarded for participating in a particular series of military operations in a certain area with a defined goal. However, these were not awarded in the First World War and are more relevant to medals from other wars such as the Boer or Second World War. Who might have been awarded them? The Service Medals were awarded to the servicemen and women who met the criteria. An individual could earn between one and four, but usually received two or three. Why were people awarded Service Medals? Medals have been awarded to commemorate wars and battles throughout history dating back to the Roman Empire. First World War Service Medals indicate that the individual served Britain overseas during the war during a particular period or in a particular role. Other types of medals include those awarded for bravery, long service, or a specific type of work.